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Sunday, May 23

  1. page Bernadette A. McAdam Artifact edited (Note: Please be patient as it takes a few minutes for the many videos on this page to load. Thank…
    (Note: Please be patient as it takes a few minutes for the many videos on this page to load. Thank you!)
    The Metamorphosis of Me: from Teaching to Facilitating in the Classroom
    How exactly am I supposed to teach a child who texts, tweets, IMs, FBs, plays RPGs and MMORGs while listening to Green Day or 50Cent? Teaching already requires the patience of Job; so adding to that challenge students whose ability to concentrate is hampered by all the distractions at their fingertips, can prematurely age even the greenest teacher. These “students need to be stimulated in ways they were never stimulated before” (Dretzin, 2010). So as a teacher, what am I to do? How do I approach this challenge in a way that sustains student engagement and enhances student achievement? Todd Oppenheimer calls this “instant gratification education” (Dretzin, 2010). My biggest fear is that I could not bridge the gap between the level at which I am teaching, and the level at which I need to be, to become an effective teacher of these 21st Century students. The surest way to a solution, of course, is to engage in some form of professional development through which I can acquire the skills and knowledge I needed; but how? “What distinguishes successful people from others is what they do with their fear” says Carly Fiorina (2007). Taking a risk is essential to success and taking that risk requires trying something new (Fiorina, 2007). As such, the Dobbs 21st Century Learning Fellowship was a natural choice and perfect fit for my goals. At least that is what I thought at the time, because what I believed about 21st Century Skills was that they all involved achieving some kind of proficiency in the use of technology. But I was wrong. 21st Century Skills encompass much more than technology, and for a long while, I had no clue about what exactly I was supposed to be doing or where I was supposed to be going. Luckily for me, I chose the right book to read during the winter break: The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need–and What We Can Do about It, by Tony Wagner (2008).
    (view changes)
    5:29 am
  2. page Bernadette A. McAdam Artifact edited ... in the Classroom. Classroom How exactly am I supposed to teach a child who texts, tweet…

    ...
    in the Classroom.Classroom
    How exactly am I supposed to teach a child who texts, tweets, IMs, FBs, plays RPGs and MMORGs while listening to Green Day or 50Cent? Teaching already requires the patience of Job; so adding to that challenge students whose ability to concentrate is hampered by all the distractions at their fingertips, can prematurely age even the greenest teacher. These “students need to be stimulated in ways they were never stimulated before” (Dretzin, 2010). So as a teacher, what am I to do? How do I approach this challenge in a way that sustains student engagement and enhances student achievement? Todd Oppenheimer calls this “instant gratification education” (Dretzin, 2010). My biggest fear is that I could not bridge the gap between the level at which I am teaching, and the level at which I need to be, to become an effective teacher of these 21st Century students. The surest way to a solution, of course, is to engage in some form of professional development through which I can acquire the skills and knowledge I needed; but how? “What distinguishes successful people from others is what they do with their fear” says Carly Fiorina (2007). Taking a risk is essential to success and taking that risk requires trying something new (Fiorina, 2007). As such, the Dobbs 21st Century Learning Fellowship was a natural choice and perfect fit for my goals. At least that is what I thought at the time, because what I believed about 21st Century Skills was that they all involved achieving some kind of proficiency in the use of technology. But I was wrong. 21st Century Skills encompass much more than technology, and for a long while, I had no clue about what exactly I was supposed to be doing or where I was supposed to be going. Luckily for me, I chose the right book to read during the winter break: The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need–and What We Can Do about It, by Tony Wagner (2008).
    For the first time after a lot of reading about what 21st Century Skills are, I got a clearer picture of what we as educators and instructional leaders must accomplish. Wagner’s extensive research and revealing interviews with corporate America identify what he has coined the “Seven Survival Skills” that students need to compete for jobs on a global scale and become active informed citizens in a democracy (p 10): 1) critical thinking and problem solving; “kids need to be problem solvers” (Dretzin, 2010); 2) collaboration across networks and leading by influence; 3) agility and adaptability; 4) initiative and entrepreneurialism; 5) effective oral and written communication; 6) accessing and analyzing information; and 7) curiosity and imagination (p 67); the world is going to require students to do stuff, to build stuff, not memorize as we used to do (Dretzin, 2010). Not only does Wagner clearly define what industry’s expectations are with regard to each skill, but he also exposes the contrast between what employers are seeking and what is actually being taught in the classroom. Wagner’s “learning walks” (p 47-63) in some of America’s best schools with willing instructional leaders revealed how disturbingly deficient our instruction is with regard to what students actually need to be successful after high school.
    ...
    "It's not only the sheer quantity of information [that's challenging], but also how rapidly [it changes]."
    7) Curiosity and Imagination:
    ...
    on innovation."
    While I still have work to do in getting my students to connect with online communities to collaborate on broader assignments, I did manage to encourage their use of online collaborative tools to complete their work. Students utilized my Teacherweb site and the resources therein; they engaged in discussion using Facebook, Skype, and other tools. In addition, during our recent trip to Greece, I required the students on the trip to compose an online tour diary through which they were to share their daily experiences. All in all, I believe that my students and I had a very successful year that was certainly enhanced by the skills and knowledge I acquired during my tenure with the Dobbs 21st Century Learning Fellowship: I “reconstructed [my] self-understandings through opportunities to improve teaching practices and reinforce [my] professional [identity] (Darby, 2006).
    References:
    (view changes)
    5:27 am

Friday, May 21

  1. page Bernadette A. McAdam Artifact edited The Metamorphosis of Me: from Teaching to Facilitating in the Classroom. How exactly am I sup…

    The Metamorphosis of Me: from Teaching to Facilitating in the Classroom.
    How exactly am I supposed to teach a child who texts, tweets, IMs, FBs, plays RPGs and MMORGs while listening to Green Day or 50Cent? Teaching already requires the patience of Job; so adding to that challenge students whose ability to concentrate is hampered by all the distractions at their fingertips, can prematurely age even the greenest teacher. These “students need to be stimulated in ways they were never stimulated before” (Dretzin, 2010). So as a teacher, what am I to do? How do I approach this challenge in a way that sustains student engagement and enhances student achievement? Todd Oppenheimer calls this “instant gratification education” (Dretzin, 2010). My biggest fear is that I could not bridge the gap between the level at which I am teaching, and the level at which I need to be, to become an effective teacher of these 21st Century students. The surest way to a solution, of course, is to engage in some form of professional development through which I can acquire the skills and knowledge I needed; but how? “What distinguishes successful people from others is what they do with their fear” says Carly Fiorina (2007). Taking a risk is essential to success and taking that risk requires trying something new (Fiorina, 2007). As such, the Dobbs 21st Century Learning Fellowship was a natural choice and perfect fit for my goals. At least that is what I thought at the time, because what I believed about 21st Century Skills was that they all involved achieving some kind of proficiency in the use of technology. But I was wrong. 21st Century Skills encompass much more than technology, and for a long while, I had no clue about what exactly I was supposed to be doing or where I was supposed to be going. Luckily for me, I chose the right book to read during the winter break: The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need–and What We Can Do about It, by Tony Wagner (2008).
    (view changes)
    7:11 pm
  2. page Bernadette A. McAdam Artifact edited The Metamorphosis of Me: from Teaching to Facilitating in the Classroom. ... (Fiorina, 2007…

    The Metamorphosis of Me: from Teaching to Facilitating in the Classroom.
    ...
    (Fiorina, 2007).
    As
    As such, the
    For the first time after a lot of reading about what 21st Century Skills are, I got a clearer picture of what we as educators and instructional leaders must accomplish. Wagner’s extensive research and revealing interviews with corporate America identify what he has coined the “Seven Survival Skills” that students need to compete for jobs on a global scale and become active informed citizens in a democracy (p 10): 1) critical thinking and problem solving; “kids need to be problem solvers” (Dretzin, 2010); 2) collaboration across networks and leading by influence; 3) agility and adaptability; 4) initiative and entrepreneurialism; 5) effective oral and written communication; 6) accessing and analyzing information; and 7) curiosity and imagination (p 67); the world is going to require students to do stuff, to build stuff, not memorize as we used to do (Dretzin, 2010). Not only does Wagner clearly define what industry’s expectations are with regard to each skill, but he also exposes the contrast between what employers are seeking and what is actually being taught in the classroom. Wagner’s “learning walks” (p 47-63) in some of America’s best schools with willing instructional leaders revealed how disturbingly deficient our instruction is with regard to what students actually need to be successful after high school.
    First, I set goals:
    (view changes)
    7:04 pm
  3. page Bernadette A. McAdam Artifact edited =The The Metamorphosis of ... in the Classroom.= Classroom. How exactly am I supposed to t…
    =TheThe Metamorphosis of
    ...
    in the Classroom.= Classroom.
    How exactly am I supposed to teach a child who texts, tweets, IMs, FBs, plays RPGs and MMORGs while listening to Green Day or 50Cent? Teaching already requires the patience of Job; so adding to that challenge students whose ability to concentrate is hampered by all the distractions at their fingertips, can prematurely age even the greenest teacher. These “students need to be stimulated in ways they were never stimulated before” (Dretzin, 2010). So as a teacher, what am I to do? How do I approach this challenge in a way that sustains student engagement and enhances student achievement? Todd Oppenheimer calls this “instant gratification education” (Dretzin, 2010). My biggest fear is that I could not bridge the gap between the level at which I am teaching, and the level at which I need to be, to become an effective teacher of these 21st Century students. The surest way to a solution, of course, is to engage in some form of professional development through which I can acquire the skills and knowledge I needed; but how? “What distinguishes successful people from others is what they do with their fear” says Carly Fiorina (2007). Taking a risk is essential to success and taking that risk requires trying something new (Fiorina, 2007).
    As such, the Dobbs 21st Century Learning Fellowship was a natural choice and perfect fit for my goals. At least that is what I thought at the time, because what I believed about 21st Century Skills was that they all involved achieving some kind of proficiency in the use of technology. But I was wrong. 21st Century Skills encompass much more than technology, and for a long while, I had no clue about what exactly I was supposed to be doing or where I was supposed to be going. Luckily for me, I chose the right book to read during the winter break: The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need–and What We Can Do about It, by Tony Wagner (2008).
    (view changes)
    7:02 pm
  4. page Bernadette A. McAdam Artifact edited The =The Metamorphosis of ... in the Classroom. Classroom.= How exactly am I supposed t…

    The
    =The Metamorphosis of
    ...
    in the Classroom.Classroom.=
    How exactly am I supposed to teach a child who texts, tweets, IMs, FBs, plays RPGs and MMORGs while listening to Green Day or 50Cent? Teaching already requires the patience of Job; so adding to that challenge students whose ability to concentrate is hampered by all the distractions at their fingertips, can prematurely age even the greenest teacher. These “students need to be stimulated in ways they were never stimulated before” (Dretzin, 2010). So as a teacher, what am I to do? How do I approach this challenge in a way that sustains student engagement and enhances student achievement? Todd Oppenheimer calls this “instant gratification education” (Dretzin, 2010). My biggest fear is that I could not bridge the gap between the level at which I am teaching, and the level at which I need to be, to become an effective teacher of these 21st Century students. The surest way to a solution, of course, is to engage in some form of professional development through which I can acquire the skills and knowledge I needed; but how? “What distinguishes successful people from others is what they do with their fear” says Carly Fiorina (2007). Taking a risk is essential to success and taking that risk requires trying something new (Fiorina, 2007).
    As such, the Dobbs 21st Century Learning Fellowship was a natural choice and perfect fit for my goals. At least that is what I thought at the time, because what I believed about 21st Century Skills was that they all involved achieving some kind of proficiency in the use of technology. But I was wrong. 21st Century Skills encompass much more than technology, and for a long while, I had no clue about what exactly I was supposed to be doing or where I was supposed to be going. Luckily for me, I chose the right book to read during the winter break: The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need–and What We Can Do about It, by Tony Wagner (2008).
    (view changes)
    7:00 pm
  5. page Bernadette A. McAdam Artifact edited =The The Metamorphosis of ... in the Classroom.= Classroom. How exactly am I supposed to…
    =The
    The
    Metamorphosis of
    ...
    in the Classroom.=Classroom.
    How exactly am I supposed to teach a child who texts, tweets, IMs, FBs, plays RPGs and MMORGs while listening to Green Day or 50Cent? Teaching already requires the patience of Job; so adding to that challenge students whose ability to concentrate is hampered by all the distractions at their fingertips, can prematurely age even the greenest teacher. These “students need to be stimulated in ways they were never stimulated before” (Dretzin, 2010). So as a teacher, what am I to do? How do I approach this challenge in a way that sustains student engagement and enhances student achievement? Todd Oppenheimer calls this “instant gratification education” (Dretzin, 2010). My biggest fear is that I could not bridge the gap between the level at which I am teaching, and the level at which I need to be, to become an effective teacher of these 21st Century students. The surest way to a solution, of course, is to engage in some form of professional development through which I can acquire the skills and knowledge I needed; but how? “What distinguishes successful people from others is what they do with their fear” says Carly Fiorina (2007). Taking a risk is essential to success and taking that risk requires trying something new (Fiorina, 2007).
    As such, the Dobbs 21st Century Learning Fellowship was a natural choice and perfect fit for my goals. At least that is what I thought at the time, because what I believed about 21st Century Skills was that they all involved achieving some kind of proficiency in the use of technology. But I was wrong. 21st Century Skills encompass much more than technology, and for a long while, I had no clue about what exactly I was supposed to be doing or where I was supposed to be going. Luckily for me, I chose the right book to read during the winter break: The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need–and What We Can Do about It, by Tony Wagner (2008).
    ...
    Educational Leadership. Vol. 67. No 1. 16-21.
    The Global Achievement Gap - Tony's new book is now available in bookstores and online!
    . http://www.schoolchange.org/news/
    the_global_achievement_gap__tonys_latest_book_is_now_for_sale_in_bookstores_and_
    online!.html. Dec 26, 2009.
    Wagner, Tony. (2008). The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don't Teach
    the New Survival Skills Our Children Need—and What We Can Do About It. New York:
    Basic Books.//
    (view changes)
    5:59 pm

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